Metric System

Description - A system of measure for lengths, distances, weights and other values by a standard method.

History of Metric System

The metric system was invented by a group of French scientists. France changed their measuring to the metric system in 1799. In 1837, France officiallychanged their measuring system to the metric system. In 1790 Thomas Jefferson recommended that the metric system be used in America. In 1821, John Quincy Adams advocated the change to the metric system. Both times Americans rejected the idea. After World War II other countries adopted the system. China, Egypt and India now use it. The United States, Liberia and Magamar have remained on the standard system. The United Kingdom uses the Metric System Commercially.

TOPIC DESCRIPTION - The metric system was designed to be universal so that anyone can use it. To help make it universal, common symbols such as, km for killometer were developed making the metric system independent from language. The metric system uses the base 10 system which makes it easier to convert from one measurement to another. Meters are measured in Millimeters, centimeters, decimeter, decameters, hectometers, kilometers and myriameters. A meter is similar to the yard as a unit of length and the liter is close to a quart.

Application of Metric System - The Metric System is considered a more simplified form of measurement. It is used in track and field events. Contestants run a race based on Meters. They might race for 1,500 meters instead of a mile. In measuring the weight of gem stones, one carat weighs 200 millligrams. in the U S, the metric system is used by the government in Geodectic Surveys and in tariffs operations. Radio stations use it in defining the wave lengths which are assigned to them. Scientists use the metric system in measuring many things from the atom to cosmic rays.

Metric Table

  • The gram measures weight.
  • The meter measures length.

  • The liter measures capacity.

thousands
hundreds
tens
basic unit
tenths
hundredths
thousandths
1000
100
10
1
0.1
0.01
0.001
kilo-
hecto-
deca-
Meter GramLiter
deci-
centi-
milli-



References

  1. Beiser, A. (1988). Physical Science (2nd Edition). New York, NY: McGraw Hill
  2. (Ref #2 - from internet) http://.wiki.answers.com
  3. (Ref #3 - from book, - World Book Encyclopedia Volumne 13 Pg 360
This WikiPage developed by Dot Martin- 2011SU)