(Electric Field)

An Electric Field is a region of space in which a charge would be acted upon by an electric force. (Beiser pg 81) An electric field may be produced by one or more charges, and it may be uniform or it may vary in magnitude, direction, or both from place to place. (Beiser pg 81)
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History of (Topic)

Micheal Faraday introduced the concept of an electric field in 1821.(Tyndall)
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Application of (Topic)

Electric fields are produced by the local build-up of electric charges in the atmosphere associated with thunderstorms.(unknown author)
Besides natural sources the electromagnetic spectrum also includes fields generated by human-made sources: X-rays are employed to diagnose a broken limb after a sport accident. The electricity that comes out of every power socket has associated low frequency electromagnetic fields. And various kinds of higher frequency radiowaves are used to transmit information – whether via TV antennas, radio stations or mobile phone base stations.(Unknown author)
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References

  1. Beiser, A. (1988). Physical Science (2nd Edition). New York, NY: McGraw Hill
  2. Tyndall, John. "Michael Faraday." The Great Idea Finder - Celebrating the Spirit of Innovation. The Great Idea Finder, 9 Oct. 2006. Web. 26 July 2011. <http://www.ideafinder.com/history/inventors/faraday.htm>.
  3. "WHO | What Are Electromagnetic Fields?" What Are Electircmagnetic Fields? WHO. Web. 26 July 2011. <http://www.who.int/peh-emf/about/WhatisEMF/en/>.
  4. http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://static.newworldencyclopedia.org/thumb/9/9c/Michael_Faraday_-_Project_Gutenberg_eText_13103.jpg/200px-Michael_Faraday_-_Project_Gutenberg_eText_13103.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Michael_Faraday&h=270&w=200&sz=15&tbnid=lpRQ6c3c0x3ZvM:&tbnh=97&tbnw=72&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dmichael%2Bfaraday%26tbm%3Disch%26tbo%3Du&zoom=1&q=michael+faraday&docid=TEllaOOJQ_CIWM&hl=en&sa=X&ei=0AIvTqaXKMeftgf-wuGkCQ&sqi=2&ved=0CDUQ9QEwBA
  5. http://www.google.com/imgres?q=electric+field&um=1&hl=en&sa=N&biw=1024&bih=576&tbm=isch&tbnid=tGSnyfsTj5ZmKM:&imgrefurl=http://sdsu-physics.org/physics180/physics180B/Chapters/electric_forces_fields.htm&docid=nmdK6_3Ld9lfnM&w=450&h=322&ei=KAQvTpmlHoaatwebxZmkCQ&zoom=1&iact=rc&dur=47&page=2&tbnh=119&tbnw=164&start=15&ndsp=14&ved=1t:429,r:2,s:15&tx=93&ty=46
  6. http://www.google.com/imgres?q=x+ray&um=1&hl=en&sa=N&tbm=isch&tbnid=vBXo-Fftlh6UHM:&imgrefurl=http://www.cebasstation.com/index.php%253Fpid%253Dproduct%2526prd_id%253D72%2526feature%253D940&docid=c8_qb9sbvSP-mM&w=500&h=375&ei=TwQvTqfQEZCDtgeIpaikCQ&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=235&vpy=121&dur=500&hovh=194&hovw=259&tx=163&ty=115&page=1&tbnh=125&tbnw=148&start=0&ndsp=18&ved=1t:429,r:1,s:0&biw=1024&bih=576
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